Tag Archive: Space


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TRI-US ENTERTAINMENT - "Going beyond the frontier of time"

Our Earth in the Universe… is in a state of evolving flux… and now more than ever we are being shaken and rattled … but will we human beings really take the present signs and utilize them to full potential?

H.G. Wells has some wonderful quotes, and as I begin this new article, I think of him and quote some beauties…

“Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe.” and “Civilization is a race between disaster and education.”

“It is possible to believe that all the past is but the beginning of a beginning, and that all that is and has been is but the twilight of the dawn. It is possible to believe that all the human mind has ever accomplished is but the dream before the awakening.”

“No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man’s and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water.”
— H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)

Nowadays, we have better instruments and more powerful cameras able to capture activities going vast distances away… such as the a 1,400 megapixel digital camera used by the Pan-STARRS Team at the University of Hawaii that recently discovered a New Comet that may Be Visible From Earth in 2013. While there is no danger of collision with Earth, preliminary calculations of the comet’s orbit show that this may be its first and final trip through the solar system. “It may be coming around the sun for the first and only time, only to be ejected from the solar system, never to return,” says Richard Wainscoat, co-discoverer of the comet and an astronomer at the University of Hawaii. “Since we don’t have a lot of data on it, we really don’t know the orbit well enough right now, and it will take up to two months of observations to find out.” he goes on to say. Astronomers believe the new comet, named C/2011 L4 may be a runaway from the Oort cloud, a reservoir of billions of hibernating comets that orbits about 100,000 times farther than the distance between Earth and the sun.

Our Cosmic Neighborhood As the article mentions, “from our small world we have gazed upon the cosmic ocean for thousands of years. Ancient astronomers observed points of light that appeared to move among the stars. They called these objects “planets,” meaning wanderers, and named them after Roman deities—Jupiter, king of the gods; Mars, the god of war; Mercury, messenger of the gods; Venus, the goddes of love and beauty, and Saturn, father of Jupiter and god of agriculture. The stargazers also observed comets with sparkling tails, and meteors or shooting stars apparently falling from the sky.

Since the invention of the telescope, three more planets have been discovered in our solar system: Uranus (1781), Neptune (1846), and, now downgraded to a dwarf planet, Pluto (1930). In addition, there are thousands of small bodies such as asteroids and comets. Most of the asteroids orbit in a region between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, while the home of comets lies far beyond the orbit of Pluto, in the Oort Cloud.”

A wonderful array of picture can be found at a PPhoto Gallery: Solar System and Space Pictures This Week: Lunar Eclipse, Sun Spurts, and More.

If you’re reading the signs, newly discovered comets such as C/2011 L4, Nibiru (Planet X) and other movements affecting our weather and our Earth’s magnetic field, all combined certainly lead us to the conclusion that we are in for some very interesting times…

But despite all this, as long as we acknowledge and take heed of the signs, control of our destiny through our ability to focus energy on the positives will ensure humanity maintains a balance with our universal truths…

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TRI-US ENTERTAINMENT

The Extinction Protocol: 2012 and beyond

Having been focused on developing a number of my film projects, and neglecting updating this blog, I would like to draw your attention to a couple of blogs that have captured my attention and more to the point kept me coming back for more…

The publishers have been doing a great job of posting interesting, thought provoking commentary on global events… The Extinction Protocol: 2012 and beyond features selected articles, insights and perspectives on our existence in the face of weather phenomena that is described as irregular and unusal.

The Santos Republic

The Voice of the 21 Century Generation

Another very active and prominent blog site published by the renowned, outspoken and highly knowledgeable, Dr. M. J. Santos publishes daily news at “The Santos Republic” … Staying informed in this ever dynamic and changing world is more crucial than ever… in fact, your LIFE REALLY DEPENDS ON YOUR WILLINGNESS TO ADAPT & LEARN in the face of evolutionary change!

As and when time permits I will bring you more of my views and interests… but for the moment, film making is taking a front position…

Blessings,

James With - Son of a Gunn
James With, Son of a Gunn

With all the recent publicity focused on Earthquakes, Tsunamis, Floods and other “Natural Disasters” afflicting our planet, coupled with increased knowledge of our universe … it is so worrying to note the number of leading astronomers who have been pronounced dead in the last months …

John Huchra died unexpectedly on October 8th 2010 at the age of 61.

Allan Sandage died on Saturday, 13th November 2010. Sandage, who worked with Edwin Hubble as an assistant at Mount Wilson Observatory, played an integral part in increasing our understanding of the scale of the Universe and determining the Hubble Constant, which describes the Universe’s expansion. The New York Times article announced that Carnegie Institution for Science reported the cause of death. Sandage, working at the Carnegie Observatories in California, continued his efforts to hone the Hubble Constant, in his latter years using the Hubble Space Telescope to observe extragalactic Type Ia supernovae as standard candles. Sandage is also credited with discovering the starburst activity and black hole jets in the galaxy M82, and published the comprehensive Hubble Atlas of Galaxies, in 1961. He continued to research and publish papers right up until his death, his last paper on RR Lyrae variable stars (another kind of standard candle) appearing in the Astrophysical Journal in June 2010. Sandage is considered a true giant of astronomy, and he published more than 500 scientific papers in total throughout his career.

Brian Marsden passed away on 18th November 2010 at the age of 73 following a prolonged illness.

For more on these noted astronomers, links to their Wikipedia listing are listed here:
John Huchra
Allan Sandage
Brian Marsden

Then, subsequently, an article published on Saturday, 20th November 2010 in thespec.com caught my attention. It drew attention to a team of Czech and Danish scientists who are seeking to solve a 400-year-old mystery, as to the death surrounding a 16th-century Danish astronomer, Tycho Brahe, whose celestial observations laid the groundwork for modern astronomy and who died in Prague in 1601, age 54 on October 24, 1601 after some days of illness.